Boulder Teen Clinic

My boyfriend and I had anal sex and he came in my butt. I felt some of it go down to my vagina as I was walking to the restroom. Is there a possiblity of pregnancy?

Pregnancy is possible whenever semen enters the vagina. If semen accidentally got into the vagina during anal sex, yes, there would be a risk for pregnancy. Or, if some of the ejaculate leaked from the anus to the vaginal opening, you could be at risk of pregnancy.

Bu the only way to know for sure if you’re pregnancy is to take a pregnancy test 14 days after the unprotected sex. At that time, you will get an accurate result. (And consider visiting Teen Clinic to start a reliable birth control method soon!)  However, know that semen coming in contact with the anus does not cause pregnancy.

While unprotected anal sex is considered low-risk for pregnancy, it is high-risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections. That’s because the lining of the anus is very fragile and can tear during sexual activity. Small tears (known as anal fissures) may occur during intercourse. Fissures can be fairly painful and slow to heal, and provide a direct route into the bloodstream. Most anal fissures won’t cause permanent damage to the rectum, however.

In the future, Teen Clinic recommends using condoms 100%—this can help set your mind at ease. There are also ways to decrease the risks of discomfort or tearing during anal sex—check out this question to learn more.

I recently had unprotected vaginal and anal sex for the first time. My partner pulled out of me a couple minutes after we started having vaginal intercourse and we began having anal shortly after…

…He came inside of me and I’m afraid it dripped down to my vaginal opening. I can’t afford Plan B, I’m 16 and a half. I know it wasn’t a very good idea in the first place, but is there anywhere I could possibly get a free Plan B?

In order for someone to get pregnant, semen needs to come into direct contact with the vagina. But even if someone does not ejaculate in the vagina, there is still a risk of pregnancy. If someone ejaculates on the outside of the body but still near the vagina, sperm can travel in to the vagina, putting them at risk of pregnancy.

If someone is having unprotected sex, but they don’t ejaculate in or near their  partner, pregnancy can still be possible as well because of something called pre-cum (or pre-ejaculate). Pre-cum is something that everyone with a penis does when arousal happens. Pre-cum—officially called pre-ejaculate—is a clear, sticky fluid released by the penis between the beginning of arousal and ejaculation.

Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.  Pre-ejaculate can also transmit STIs.

So even though your partner ejaculated during anal sex, if sperm traveled to the vagina opening, pregnancy could be possible. Or, if pre-ejaculate was released during vaginal sex, pregnancy could be a possibility as well.

But the good news is that Teen Clinic offers free or low-cost and confidential sexual health services. If you are 17 and under, all of our services are completely free!

Plan B may be anywhere from $30-60 at a pharmacy, but at Teen Clinic the most someone will pay for it is $3!

We have Teen Clinic at both our Boulder and Longmont locations. You can find our hours here, and find out more about pricing here.

The best way to avoid pregnancy is to use forms of birth control consistently and correctly. Teen Clinic offers all different types of birth control. Call us at 303-442-5160 if you have more questions or want to make an appointment!

I’m on birth control and have been for about a year. I am only 14, and I know birth control is supposed to lessen my period, but I went on birth control last December…

…since May, I have been getting my period very lightly for like a day or I have missed it. Last weekend my boyfriend put it in up my butt, and his penis felt wet against my back, but he pulled it out really quickly. Then I gave him a handjob, he peed, and then we had sex. We had sex for about 30 seconds, and it wasn’t all the way in. He said he did not cum. He also told me when he ejaculates he does not pre-cum. I missed my period again, and I’m scared it is because I’m pregnant! I read about your boobs being swollen, darker, and they hurt, now that I think about it my one boob looks kind of swollen, darker, and hurts! It has only been a week since we had sex! Everyone is telling me my boob hurts because I’m paranoid! But could I be pregnant? Please get back to me ASAP! I’m freaking!

It’s important to note that the only way to 100% prevent STIs and unplanned pregnancy is to practice abstinence. Abstinence is when someone refrains from oral, anal, or vaginal sex. However, if you have been taking your birth control correctly and consistently, you will be up to 99% protected from pregnancy. If you have not been taking your birth control either on time or incorrectly, you could be at risk of pregnancy.

Your risk of pregnancy is lower when engaging in anal sex, but without use of a barrier method, like a condom, you are at risk of STI transmission.

Although your partner did not ejaculate inside of you, pre-cum is something that everyone with a penis does when arousal happens. Pre-cum—officially called pre-ejaculate—is a clear, sticky fluid released by the penis between the beginning of arousal and ejaculation.  Doctors believe that pre-ejaculate helps make the urethra and the vagina less acidic, allowing sperm to survive longer.  Some males release a small amount of pre-ejaculate; others may release quite a bit.

Although pre-ejaculate does not contain sperm when it is produced, it can pick up leftover sperm in the urethra. This means that pre-ejaculate can contain sperm when it leaves the body, creating a risk for pregnancy.  Pre-ejaculate can also transmit STIs. Because your partner urinated before having vaginal sex with you, there’s a small chance that there was any sperm left in the urethral tract, but it can be impossible to know for sure!

Depending on your method of birth control, irregular bleeding can be a common side effect. If you haven’t had a consistent period on your current method, you may want to talk with the medical provider who prescribed it to you. They will be able to help you figure out what may be going on with your body and possibly help you control those side effects!

There can be many symptoms of pregnancy, but those symptoms can be inconclusive. All of the symptoms that you’ve described can be signs of things other than pregnancy (like your period). The only way to know for sure if you’re pregnant is to take a test 2 weeks after your most recent sexual encounter.

Make an appointment with a medical professional to talk about your irregular period! Teen Clinic is here to help. We offer free or low-cost appointments. Learn how to make an appointment here.

I had unprotected anal sex with my boyfriend. He “accidentally” came inside me a little bit…

…We put toilet paper over my vagina and under his penis as he pulled out. What are my chances of being pregnant? I was also laying on my back, and I later tried to push the semen out. Nothing came out! I’m three days from my expected period. I need reassurance.

Pregnancy is possible whenever semen enters the vagina. If semen accidentally got into the vagina during anal sex, yes, there would be a risk for pregnancy. It’s best to know for sure–take a pregnancy test 14 days after the unprotected sex. (And consider visiting Teen Clinic to start a reliable birth control method soon!)  However, know that semen coming in contact with the anus does not cause pregnancy.

While unprotected anal sex is considered low-risk for pregnancy, it is high-risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections. That’s because the lining of the anus is very fragile and can tear during sexual activity. Small tears (known as anal fissures) may occur during intercourse. Fissures can be fairly painful and slow to heal, and provide a direct route into the bloodstream. Most anal fissures won’t cause permanent damage to the rectum, however.

In the future, Teen Clinic recommends using condoms 100%—this can help set your mind at ease. There are also ways to decrease the risks of discomfort or tearing during anal sex—check out this question to learn more.

I had unprotected anal sex in the lake about two days ago, then today I’ve had a little bit of bloody discharge. Am I pregnant?

Pregnancy is possible whenever semen enters the vagina. If semen accidentally got into the vagina during anal sex, yes, there would be a risk for pregnancy. It’s best to know for sure–take a pregnancy test ten days after the unprotected sex. (And consider visiting Teen Clinic to start a reliable birth control method soon!)  However, know that semen coming in contact with the anus does not cause pregnancy.

While unprotected anal sex is considered low-risk for pregnancy, it is high-risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections. That’s because the lining of the anus is very fragile and can tear during sexual activity. The discharge you are experiencing may be a sign of infection, or it could be related to an anal fissure. It’s a good idea to make an appointment at Teen Clinic if you are experiencing pain or if the bleeding continues.

In the future, Teen Clinic recommends using condoms 100%—this can help set your mind at ease. There are also ways to decrease the risks of discomfort or tearing during anal sex—check out this question to learn more. Thanks for checking in!

My boyfriend and I had anal sex. We didn’t use a condom and he didn’t ejaculate in me…

…Neither of us have been sexually active with anybody else—is there any possible way something might happen?

Great question!  In order to get an infection, a person has to come into contact with someone who is already infected. If neither of you have been sexually active before, it’s unlikely that an infection could have spread between you. However, in the future it’s a great idea to wear a condom anyway. Being in the habit of wearing a condom will make it easier to stay safe and healthy with future partners. It’s your health!

Because the anal tissues are very delicate, there is a small risk of anal fissures from this type of intercourse.  For some health tips related to anal sex, check out this question.

I am a gay male thinking about anal sex. Are there health risks other than possible STIs?

Great question! Asking questions before engaging in sexual activity is the best way to make informed, safe and healthy decisions. As with many types of sexual activity, unprotected anal sex can transmit STIs if a partner is infected. Anal sex presents an increased risk of infection because the lining of the rectum is a thin membrane that can easily be torn or damaged during sex.  Small tears (known as anal fissures) may occur during intercourse. Fissures can be fairly painful and slow to heal, and provide a direct route into the bloodstream–so you’re right to worry about sexually transmitted infections! Most anal fissures won’t cause permanent damage to the rectum, however.

Many doctors recommend exploring anal sex by using a lubricated finger first.  Because the anus does not self-lubricate, it’s important to keep a bottle of water-based lubricant on hand; this will help prevent fissures and make the experience more pleasurable.  When you begin having anal sex with a partner, be sure to wear a condom every time.  The insertive partner can choose to wear male latex condoms, or the receptive partner can choose to wear a Reality Condom (also known as a female condom). Both are available for free at Teen Clinic. (Wear only one condom at a time, however!)

Remember:  if you feel pain at any time during sex, slow down, communicate with your partner, and consider using more lubricant. And make an appointment at Teen Clinic if you ever experience any irregular bleeding or internal pain after intercourse.

Could you get someone pregnant through anal sex?

The anus is part of the digestive tract. It is not connected to any reproductive organs, so if semen was ejaculated into the anus there is no chance of pregnancy. The only time pregnancy would be a risk during anal play is if semen got in or around the vagina. Since the anus and vaginal opening are very close together, there is a small risk of this happening.

Condoms and birth control methods can prevent pregnancy and STIs. While there is no risk for pregnancy during anal sex, it is very risky for STI transmission. Getting tested, using a condom and lube are very important and successful precautions for preventing STI transmission.

Is it wrong to have anal sex without protection? Could I be pregnant if my partner cums inside me?

You could be at risk for pregnancy if sperm gets in or around the vagina. Since the anus is close to the vaginal opening, there is a small risk of sperm traveling close to the vagina, but it’s unlikely. However, unprotected anal sex is especially risky for contracting STIs. The tissue of the anus is fragile thus vulnerable to infection. The natural friction of sex can cause tearing, creating an opening into the blood stream. A condom with extra lubrication is an effective way to reduce the risk of STI transmission and prevent tearing. It’s important that you and a partner both get tested for STIs. For free STI testing, call Teen Clinic at 303.442.5160

We don’t like to use the words “right” and “wrong” when it comes to sexual activity, but it is important to think about whether its safe and healthy. Think about your personal boundaries when it comes to sex and talk with your partner about his or hers. Any type of sex should be comfortable, consensual and safe.

During anal sex, if I poop what happens?

Because anal sex involves stimulation of the anus, there is a good chance of contact with waste products (poop). It’s a good idea for a partner receiving anal sex to take a trip to the toilet (and possibly a shower) before engaging in any sex. If the receiver has recently made a bowel movement and has a healthy digestive system (no diarrhea, constipation etc) only small amounts of waste products will remain in the anus & rectum. It is critical to thoroughly clean the penis afterwards, especially before engaging in vaginal intercourse or receiving oral sex.  Remember – always use a condom and lots of water-based lube to ensure that the condom doesn’t tear. Anal sex is considered a high risk behavior for STI transmission.